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their christmas tree. just as technology gradually consumes more of our wealth, toymakers are increasingly weaving it into a child's play experience, using touch screens, apps and built in technology. >> as technology becomes more prevalent in the home, children are instantly drawn to what parents have. the ipad is becoming a family purchase. >> but luckily, there are simpler openings out there driving the market. >> we have seen a lot of lovely toys today, haven't we, hannah? >> yeah. >> what is your favorite toy that you've seen here? >> the dollies. >> the dollies? >> parents will notice a lot of old favorites coming back with a money day twist. so is this a reflection of the bearish times we're living in or is it a wishful remembrance of christmas past? >> legos has always been a retrotoy. but yes, during tough times, people come back to tried and true brands and brands they know have great play value. >> wonderful 2013 products that will probably sneak into the market this christmas. it's turtles. and that was another retrovoid coming back. but companies have to be innovated, they have to kee
for the suggestion. we have about 25 minutes left. we'll come back and talk with jason pontin of the "mit technology review." the subject is about solving big problems in america. we'll take your calls in a moment. [video clip] >> the british admirals and generals were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and it's clear the colonists were pulling together the ammunition and cannons. the king basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the collins found out about the order in new hampshire and rhode island, they took the ammunition so everybody knew it was coming in the winter of 77 for-1775 -- in the winter of 1774-1775. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are focusing on the "mit technology review." we are talking about big problems in the world. we will get to this coverage in just a second. this is ja
with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth. something unpleasant but -- and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. b
, technology, engineering, and mathematics. the republican measure drew fire from democrats, some democrats, some going so far as to level the measure racist. >> that is acist if not in its intent then certainly in its effect. republicans have received were just received historically low votes from minorities in the past election, yet they want to create an immigration system that gives vises with one hand while taking them away from minorities with the other. lou:joining as now, the co-author of numerous anti illegal immigration laws in a kansas secretary of state, also with us, the attorney, executive director of the national immigration forum. good to have you with t through no fault of their own, brought into the country by their parents. what are your reactions? >> let me react to both bills. i agree that the s.t.e.m. jobs act as an example of a perfectly good bill. what we were doing since 1965, as every year he we were giving away 50,000 green cards in a lottery all over the world. thi what it does is take thoseves t t5,000 visas and gives them awa in a way that serves oured d nation
, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological innovation. there has to be a greater appreciation for the role of science and technology in society. we have to get young women engaged early. we found that if young women are engaged in experiments to work, if they are part of the team, it makes a big difference. we try to create an intergene rational mentoring system. when young women come through the ranks through the promotion and tenure process, we have to ensure fairness of the system. it is a complex problem. that is why it is hard for people to talk about it. >> why is it important that there are more women? >> it is important that there be more science. we are about to face what i call the quiet crisis. you have a number of scientists in this country who came of age when i did. they are beginning to retire. those retirements are going to accelerate over the next few years. the second hidden variable is that we depend strongly on immigrants. we have always been a nation of immigrants. i do not think people appreciate how much of our science and engineering work force is made
, then distribution, then production. in conjunction with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth, and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary for it to work. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is a
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opp
technology which would be necessary for any inter-continental ballistic missile to hit an actual target. south korean officials also say they've found evidence the launch was meant to test missile technology, not for peaceful space purposes as the north has claimed. president obama and the first family tonight on vacation in hawaii, he and the first lady attended a memorial service for the late senator daniel aa a inouye he died this past monday at age 88. and didn't the president have a personal connection to the senator? >> good evening, harris, he did. they're both from hawaii, different generations, but the president remembers that as a child, he looked up to senator inouye, on the watergate committee and doing public service more than 50 years in the senate, but we should remember longer than that the public service to the nation started on the battlefield, world war ii and lost his arm in battle. bottom line, he was wounded just one hill away in italy from where former senator bob dole was also wounded and senate majority leader harry reid was here hawaii today eulogizing senator
of years as opposed to decades or centuries, because that's what the capitalists and did through technology and innovation, the moment you start doing that, like having a machine that prints money, so you want to use more faster and more intensely, producing more money. if you overreach and take too much value from the future to bring it into the present, you too. the sectors in which this dynamic annapolis process is manchin to push the boundaries of technology and create wealth -- in amsterdam and holland the with-it is always local lines. there will always be surplus riches. regis and surplus regions. southern england was in debt. now is the obvious. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state inertification plus. it started in manchester, in amsterdam. it is always localized. there will always be defecit regions and surplus regions. so, manchester northern england was in surplus back then. southern england was in debt. now it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your eq
to support a growing population. we have not develop the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve their as problems -- to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we
been bugging him about moral hazard of very technological issue. when he came up to washington, he was a policy wonk too. and that's why the bush institute, i think, has been founded, because president bush has had a curiosity about economics throughout his life x it's benefited us all. basically, what we have to do is just stop doing the wrong things, and there are three things in my chapter that i talk about that we could do to really turn the country around. the first is to get tax policy right, we're not doing it. right now we're the highest corporate tax country in the developed world, we're the third highest on earth. there are two countries that are less friendly for new businesses than the u.s. on earth, that's guyana and the congo. [laughter] but after those two, you know, we're the least friendly place. and i summarize in the chapter a bunch of research that shows if we could just sort of fix the stupid things that we're doing, then you could add about a percent of growth to gdp growth over the next decade, and we're probably starting around 2-3. and then the second thing
the decision, you will probably reach a different decision about that toxic technology. how it is being produced, letting people make their decisions makes quite a difference. this gets done now. where to produce. of the workers in every enterprise made a decision where to produce, how many would close the factory and move to china? i would guess probably non. close to zero. what of thought, that the workers who had to live with a factory that closes, live in a community that will be affected by factories the close, and workers themselves make the decision. here is another one. for chris decide what to do with the profits, here's an interesting thing we expect. over the last 30 years with boards of directors, we have noticed something i am sure you have all noticed, the boards of directors decided to use the profits they were earning to give enormous increases in the salaries to top executives. we are famous in america for that. thee aratio of one executive ge to an average worker is 300 to 40s all other countries. so we have been in a major part of the ineq0 lity that i talked about be
the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we can correct what i have come to view as a very mistaken and ultimately counterproductive ide
of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in europe. >> right. >> incredible. and here's what he says. a very remarkable work is the mechanic and critique of the grange. he is allowed to be the greatest mathematician now living, and his personal worth is equal to his science. the object of his work is to reduce all the principles of mechanics to a single equi-in rum and blah, blah, blah. and then he goes on to apologize for not being able to read it. this would require a calculus degree. >> right. >> and i was a math major, and i had two years of physics. we don't get to la garage in mechanics until the junior or senior year. so now 200 years later, i'm still not up to he grange mechanics, and there is thomas jefferson discoursing on it and understood it. >> right. >> i mean, it's an incredible example of his renaissance qualities. >> right. >> finally, he ended the letter -- >> well, sir, do you have a question? [laughter] >> yes. >> or sorry. >> he, the impact of his views on educating young men and women in this country. >> sure, absolutely. he totally believed that enlightenm
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financialor literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.ra and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation forr public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> mike: from paint to pet food, hats to barbecue. as a nation, we make millions of products every year. but have you ever wondered just how those things are made and what drives those companies? tonight in this "n.b.r." special edition "made in america" we go to towns small and large to meet unique businesses building jobs and profits. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." good evening, i'm mike hegedus with an n.b.r. special edition, made in america. walking down kentucky street in downtown petaluma, california, but it could be anywhere, u.s.a. this is where sm
railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation and union bank. >> at union bank our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> egypt's new constitution is approved by more than 60% of voters who took part in the referendum. queen elizabeth h
fresh, man. oh! [ both laugh ] febreze? how about that? yeah. febreze anti-clogging technology keeps it smelling fresh. febreze. breathe happy. >>> nobody gets a hundred percent of what they want. everybody's got to give a little bit in a sensible way. we move forward together or we don't move forward at all. so as we leave town for a few days to be with our families for the holidays, i hope it gives everybody some perspective. >> that was the president of course. we're back with our roundtable. joining me congress jason chaffetz of utah, former democratic congressman of tennessee, harold ford, jr., chuck todd and nbc correspondent andrea mitchell. let's talk about the fiscal cliff. are wire going e going to get a? >> we're going to get a small deal. it's a shame. you wonder is the only thing that could change things, the holidays, does it change boehner's mind? i think the president is making a mistake to make pa small deal. he should try one more time for the big deal. you had nearly 200 house republicans about to vote to raise taxes on millionaires. that means could you get it up
want to hire, not such a bad year for you or if you provide some type of technology services that will save companies money or reduce their overhead also not such a bad outlook. it happeneds on the small business that you're in, absolutely, some will go through painful adjustments and there's no question, but there are 20 million small businesses and out there and some of them will be doing not so bad. >> jim, good to see you. thanks for joining us from philadelphia. >> thank you. >>> take a look at piers morgan interviewed by larry last week. >> we had this in great britain, scotland, 15 children killed by a maniac. everybody on the left and right came together and said enough. all handguns in britain were banned. all of them. >> my next guest writes in "the wall street journal" today that mimicking great britain on gun control isn't such a great idea. why? because ever since that ban went into place in the uk gun violence has doubled. here now is professor joyce lee malcolm and author of "guns and violence, the english experience." thanks for joining us professor, give us a
to power flight. ♪ and harness our technology for new energy solutions. [ female announcer ] around the globe, the people of boeing are working together, to build a better tomorrow. that's why we're here. ♪ ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going on now through december 31st. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. >>> since we announced we were going to have the nra's wayne lapierre on the program, we received so much feedback on line, more than 40,000 saw this post alone. we'll continue to monitor that conversation online. tell us what you saw on the interview at facebook.com/meetthepress or on twitter. in the meantime, we're going to find out what these two in the meantime, we're going to find [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you cho
recently in getting the technology up to snuff, jaime. jaime: general, if senator kerry is confirmed as the secretary of state what kind of impact do you think he can have on both syria and north korea and the threat they pose to us? >> very limited. both these countries are on automatic, sadly. the biggest threat to me is north korea. i mean, this is a threat not to the region, but it's a threat to the united states. remember mr. kim said that he was hoping to get the throw weight of this missile up over 2,000 pounds. if you miniature rise a nuclear weapon to fit on top of a icbm it will weigh 2,000 pounds. this is a threat to guam, hawaii and alaskan it's something that we in the united states need to take very, very seriously. jaime: i hear the concern in your voice. i want to ask you one other thing about africa and the al-qaida threat that exists in many nations in that part of the world and the fact that the pentagon is now taking a closer look at it, possibly even sending a brigade there to get their troops up to snuff, although that could be a real challenge. >> yeah, well th
to miniaturized technology, which is a key step in building a nuclear weapons program. but of course, we are now just waiting to find out if kim jong-un will take another step and conduct a third nuclear test. back to you. gregg: david is live in bangkok. thank you so much, david. heather: with more on this, let's bring in the director of japan studies at the american enterprise institute. thank you for joining us and i thank you for having me. hello, heather. heather: you have this article that you wrote for the national review online. the very first line of your article says this. save yourself a few precious minutes and ignoring everything that the u.s. government says about north korea. so what is going on? >> welcome the truth is we don't know what is going on. we are pretty clueless about north korea. all we know is that when it's time fore holidays and for us to relax, north korea will do something crazy like launching rockets on july 4 or maybe setting up another nuclear test around new year's. you know, we go through these cycles. we assume that one day we are going to get them back to
the resources to military power and threatening neighbors and friends and trying to shift technology abroad. it's a rogue regime. it's difficult to deal with. and it adds a complicating factor into the dynamic equation in asia between china and japan and the south china sea and the united states. >> let's switch gears now and talk about senator kerry, who will likely be secretary of state coming up. and with regard to the israeli/palestinian situation, do you think he might have an approach that could come and get something palpable done over there? >> i think that's really a presidential call. when you're dealing with israeli/palestinian issue, it's the president of the united states who's going to make that call. and really in all foreign policy it is the president's prerogative. i think what you're going to see in senator kerry is a very, very effective secretary of state who's a great member of the team. he brings a lot of experience. he brings a lot of passion, a lot of personal knowledge, and background to these issues. so i think he'll be very, very helpful as an adviser to the president
this biometric technology, where they think print individuals -- fingerprint individuals to make sure they're not committing fraud. that is been controversial. host: alisha coleman-jensen -- food insecurity by poverty status, 2011 figures. guest: food insecurity is often related to a lack of economic resources, and we find the prevalence is quite high with household incomes below the federal poverty level. host: another tweet -- corn is wasted on making fuel while people are going hungry. is that part of the problem? guest: i think it is more of an economic issue than a supply issue. we're looking at low income families and resources to purchase the food. host: staten island, new york. caller: i want to not focus on the specifics. i would label many dinos and rinos as cinos, holding to their corporate funders more than people in the state. guest: i have one point to make there. the food stamp program was in the news during the presidential campaign. there was a lot talk about caseloads going up, and the implication was that these caseloads should be cut and that is a bad thing. what we lea
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)